SBP Blog

8 fascinating facts about job interviews in China

Intern Intern - Tuesday, August 01, 2017

In this article, Stefan Verstappen, SBP author of Chinese Business Etiquette, offers some quick tips on how to nail a job interview in China: http://ow.ly/fitj30e5lGQ

Here's one example Verstappen gives:

Wait to shake
When meeting people for the first time, your safest bet is to wait until the person in authority offers to shake hands– and then follow their lead. Verstappen explains that the “Chinese didn’t use to touch each other at all when meeting, and instead used to bow with the right fist inside the left hand.” In fact, “Close physical contact wasn’t part of their tradition but was adopted during the turn of the century, and even more so the more Westernized they become.” As things evolved, Verstappen says “It used to be you would only shake hands with men, not with women” since it wasn’t considered appropriate to touch women at all. “As China becomes more modernized, women continue to demand to become active in business culture.” So, what does all this evolving etiquette mean for you? “Your best bet is to wait until they offer to shake hands, and if not, don’t.”

 

 


Like our blog? Please share it!

Categories

Subscribe to the SBP Mailing List

New Releases

Tokio Whip


A group of people walk across, around, and all over Tokyo. They talk, talk, talk.

Japanese Girl at the Siege of Changchun


An unforgettable memoir of the horrors suffered by a Japanese family trapped in Changchun, China, at the end of WW2 

 

The Osamu Tezuka Story


A documentary manga biography of the influential artist and the birth and evolution of manga and anime in Japan.

A Glossary of Zen Terms


Of special interest to scholars and students of Zen classics, a glossary of specialized vocabulary to aid understanding and practice

In the Woods of Memory


A powerful and thought-provoking novel that raises important questions about World War II, war memory, and US imperialism and blowback.

Japanese Garden Notes


Marc Peter Keane's personal journey through 100 Japanese gardens, looking at them with a designer’s eye.

Tag Cloud

RSS