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Viewed Sideways

Viewed Sideways

Writings on Culture and Style in Contemporary Japan

In this new collection, Richie once again demonstrates his mastery of the essay and his deep knowledge about Japan.


This definitive new collection of essays by the writer Time calls "the dean of arts critics in Japan" ranges from Kyogen drama to the sex shows of Shinjuku, from film and Buddhism to Butoh and retro rock 'n' roll, from wasei eigo (Japanese/English) to mizushobai, the fine art of pleasing. 


Spanning some fifty years, these thirty-seven essays—most never anthologized before—offer cross-sections of Japan's enormous cultural power. They reflect the unique perspective of a man attempting to understand his adopted home.


The writings of Donald Richie—film critic, reviewer, novelist, and essayist—have influenced generations of Japan observers around the world.

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Details

PUBLISH DATE

9/2/11

PISBN

PRICE

9781933330983

$19.95

GENRE

Essays

EISBN

PRICE

9781611725148

$9.95

DIMENSIONS

5 x 7"

HARDCOVER ISBN

PRICE

NA

NA

# OF PAGES

264

AUDIOBOOK ISBN

PRICE

NA

NA

Praise

"An indispensable guide to Japanese cinema and culture."


Library Journal


"Viewed any which way, Japan through the eyes of Donald Richie is an interesting and rewarding place to read about. This is the third collection of Richie's essays…and yet another reminder that he is a master of the short essay and a thought-provoking guide to his subject. The spare style and distinctive phrasing grow on the reader and are apt for unveiling and imparting…These elegantly brief essays are packed with insights that one needs to unravel and contemplate at one's leisure."


The Japan Times

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About the Author(s)

Donald Richie

Donald Richie

Well known for his instrumental role in introducing Japanese film to the West and for his travel memoir The Inland Sea, which was adapted into a popular PBS documentary. 

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